DIVINE GRACE (in English)

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Re: DIVINE GRACE (in English)

#61 Message par InHocSignoVinces » mar. 10 sept. 2019 12:02

These divine virtues differ from the
natural virtues.
By repeating a certain
good act frequently we gain ease and facility
in performing that act;
so, if a boy is
always attentive and ready to obey, he acquires
through this a great facility to obey ;
his first impulse is to obey, it becomes easy
to him ; we say that he has acquired the virtue
of obedience. From such acquired virtues the
divine virtues of faith, hope, and
charity differ very much ; they are not obtained
through our own efforts by a repetition
of acts,
but they are poured into the soul by
God with sanctifying grace ;
they are not
natural, but supernatural.
The difference
might be illustrated by an example. Let us
suppose that we have a young tree ; by great
care we can make that tree bear fruit, better
in quality and greater in abundance, but we
cannot make it bear a different kind of fruit ;
so, also, by our own efforts we may perform
acts of virtue more perfectly, but we cannot
perform any act which is supernatural. If,
however, a branch of a different kind is
engrafted upon the tree of which we spoke,
then it will bring forth also a different kind
of fruit ;
so it is with the infused virtues,
— by them a supernatural element is, so to
say, engrafted upon our natural faculties, and
on this account we are enabled to believe,
hope, and love in a higher, a supernatural,
manner.



To be continued...
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Re: DIVINE GRACE (in English)

#62 Message par InHocSignoVinces » jeu. 12 sept. 2019 14:03

That, by the sacrament of Baptism, the
divine virtues of faith, hope, and charity
are infused into the soul,
we learn from the
teaching of the Council of Trent, " Through
the Holy Ghost the charity of God is diffused
in the hearts of those who are justified
and inheres in them, whence in justification
man receives from Jesus Christ together
with the remission of sin, faith, hope, and
charity."
1 That these are not merely the
acts of faith, hope, and charity, we infer
from the fact that the Council teaches that
faith, hope, and charity inhere in the soul,
they remain as something permanent. This
can only be understood in the sense that
they are permanent virtues ; acts are passing,
and cannot be said to inhere in the soul.
The Church therefore teaches that in Baptism
there is infused into the soul something
that remains, by virtue of which we believe
in God, hope in Him, and love Him.
Nature
gives to children an instinct, as it were,
by which they know their parents, trust
them, and love them. There is something
beautiful in the trust that a child puts in
his parents. How he listens to their words
and receives without the least doubt all that
they tell him ! His parents may be without
any great education or learning, still the
child will accept without questioning whatever
he hears from his father. He believes his
father to be able to protect him against all enemies;
he puts the highest trust in him. As
for the love a child bears toward his parents,
it goes above all other human love; the
parents may be in lowly circumstances, yet a
child will prefer his parents to all other men
and women ; he would rather be with his
parents than with the wealthiest and most
influential persons of the world. By grace
we become the children of God.
"And because
you are sons, God hath sent the spirit
of His Son into your hearts, crying : Abba,
Father."
2 By grace, then, God also gives us
the instinct of children ; by grace we know
Him as our Father ; by grace we trust and
hope in Him ; by grace we love Him, and
cry, " Abba, Father." It is most reasonable,
therefore, to believe that, since by grace God
makes us His children, He also infuses into
our hearts with grace the divine virtues of
faith, hope, and charity. By these virtues
we show ourselves His children, and as such
we must know Him in a supernatural way,
a knowledge which comes by faith ; we must
trust in Him, and this is by hope ; we must
love Him, as a child loves his father, which
we do by the virtue of charity. Of these three
virtues St. Paul speaks when he says,
" Now
there remain faith, hope, and charity: these
three ; but the greater of these is charity."
3


To be continued...


1 Con. Trid. Sess. VI, can. 7.
2 Gal. 4- 6.
3 1 Cor. 13. 13.
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Re: DIVINE GRACE (in English)

#63 Message par InHocSignoVinces » sam. 21 sept. 2019 10:48

These virtues are infused into the soul with
sanctifying grace ; by it we become children
of God and receive on this account the
virtues which a child of God must have.
It is true we said in a former chapter that
a grown person must believe in God, must
hope in Him and begin to love Him even
before justification; but these acts do not
flow from a virtue which resides permanently
in the soul. They are done under
the influence of actual grace; they are not
permanent virtues flowing from sanctifying
grace.


The divine virtues of faith, hope,
and charity remain in the soul. They are
not passing, transient acts, but rather the root
from which such acts spring. The divine
virtues of faith, hope, and charity are infused
into the soul at Baptism. They are increased
by the worthy reception of the sacraments and
by meritorious good works. The Church
teaches us that the worthy reception of the
sacraments is always productive of grace.
Now if the sacraments always give grace,
then the sacraments of the living, since
they are received by those that already
live by the life of grace, as also the sacraments
of the dead, when received by one who
is in the state of grace, must give an increase
of sanctifying grace. Sanctifying grace is
increased in the soul by the worthy reception
of the sacraments and by good works ; for the
Church teaches that by good works we can
merit an increase of sanctifying grace, and
that grace is given to every one according to
his disposition and cooperation. By sanctifying
grace we are made " No more strangers
and foreigners: but fellow-citizens with the
saints, and the domestics of God ; "
1 by the
increase of grace through the worthy reception
of the sacraments and by good works we go
from virtue to virtue, and are " renewed from
day to day." " He that is just, let him be justified
still: and he that is holy, let him be sanctified still."
2


If by the sacraments and good works sanctifying grace is increased,
then it follows that the divine virtues, too, are
increased, since they are infused with sanctifying
grace and flow from it, just as the natural
faculties are derived from the soul. If he that
is just is by grace justified still, then — since
the Church teaches that justification consists
in the remission of sin and the renovation
of the soul through the infusion of grace and
the divine virtues — it follows that by an increase
of justification both sanctifying grace
and the divine virtues are increased. Hence
the apostles prayed, " Increase our faith," 3 and
the Apostle wished the Romans, " Now the
God of hope fill you with all joy and peace
in believing ; that you may abound in hope
and in the power of the Holy Ghost,"
4 and
prayed for the faithful, " That their charity
abound more and more."
The Church, too,
on the thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost
prays in the Mass, " Omnipotent, eternal God,
give us an increase of faith, hope, and charity."



To be continued...


1 Eph. 2. 19.
2 Apoc. 22. 11.
3 Luke 17. 5.
4 Rom. 15. 13.

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Re: DIVINE GRACE (in English)

#64 Message par InHocSignoVinces » dim. 29 sept. 2019 13:25

Do the divine virtues of faith, hope, and
charity always remain in the soul, once they
have been produced by the operation of the
Holy Ghost, through sanctifying grace, or
are they lost again when man loses grace
through sin ? This question cannot be
answered by a simple 'yes' or 'no.' It is
certain that the divine virtue of charity or the
love of God is lost when, through mortal sin,
sanctifying grace is lost. Through the love
of God we become the friends of God, but
we cannot be His friends if we are in the
state of sin, and therefore are His enemies.
One that loves God will be loved by Him,
and hence cannot but be a friend of God.
" He that loveth Me shall be loved of My
Father, and I will love him and will manifest
Myself to him."
1 Whom God loves, him He
also gives sanctifying grace. God's love is
not like our love; we love people because
they are good, but God's love makes them
good, holy, and just. God's love gives them
sanctifying grace. Charity, if not the same
as sanctifying grace, is so closely connected
with it that it is impossible to separate the
two ; no one can have charity without having
also sanctifying grace, and no one can
have sanctifying grace without having also
the virtue of charity or the love of God.


Since faith, hope, and charity are infused
together with sanctifying grace, and since
charity is lost with the loss of grace, we
would expect that the same be true also of
faith and hope. However, by a special dispensation
of God's mercy, He has wished that these virtues
remain in the soul, even after grace and charity
have been lost by mortal sin, so that the return of the
sinner to God might be easier.


Although faith and hope, like charity, are derived from sanctifying
grace, yet just as heat, which is caused by fire,
can remain even after the fire is put out, so
also the virtues of faith and hope remain after
the source, sanctifying grace, is expelled from
the soul. By faith we are Christians, and it
is clear that one does not cease to be a
Christian when he commits a mortal sin ;
and even a sinner can and must hope that
through the mercy of God his sin will be
forgiven and that he will finally be saved.


This is the teaching of the Church in the
Council of Trent. " If any man say that by
the loss of sanctifying grace faith is always
lost with it, or that faith which remains,
although no living faith, is not true faith, or
that he who has faith without charity is not
a Christian, let him be anathema."
2 The
Church teaches us, therefore, that faith is not
lost by every mortal sin, but that faith without
grace and charity is dead — that is, that
without grace, although we have faith, we
cannot do anything to merit the reward of
heaven ; we cannot even merit grace.


To be continued...


1 John 14. 21.
2 Con. Trid. Sess. VI, can. 28.

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Re: DIVINE GRACE (in English)

#65 Message par InHocSignoVinces » mer. 09 oct. 2019 20:48

Faith becomes living faith by charity ;
and of one who has living faith St. Paul says,
" The just man liveth by faith." 1 Writing to
the Corinthians, St. Paul says, " If I should have all
faith, so that I could remove mountains, and
have not charity, I am nothing."
2
He supposes, therefore, that we can have faith so
strong as to be able to work miracles without
charity and grace, but such faith would avail
us nothing for heaven ; it is dead. Although
by this faith we can do nothing to merit
heaven, it is not useless. God, in His mercy,
wished to leave us faith and hope, so that
we would be better disposed to do penance
and return to Him by real sorrow for our
sins. How good and merciful God is
to us! He gives us, without any merit
on our part, His grace of justification, and
even after we have abused this gift, He
still leaves us the virtues of faith and hope,
that we may return to Him. " The Lord is
gracious and merciful : patient and plenteous
in mercy. The Lord is sweet to all; and
His tender mercies are over all His works."
3


To be continued...

1 Rom. 1. 17.
2 I Cor. 13. 2.
3 Psalm 144. 7, 8, 9.


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